4 Anti-Aging Foods to Fix Your Dry Skin

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We all know that anti-aging nutrition is a key player in your overall health and well-being. Let’s be honest, though. It’s a little harder for a lot of people to commit to eating healthy when you can’t witness the immediate results—after all, you unfortunately won’t drop a pant size overnight. But if you could actually see how your body favorably reacts to certain foods, would it make you more inclined to continue eating them? Anti-aging foods aren’t just good for your health, but they can also have a drastic effect on the appearance of your skin, especially if you suffer from dry skin, as many older adults do.

Dry skin is usually the result of moisture that’s subsiding under the skin’s surface and can be caused by a variety of factors, such as harsh weather, UV damage, hormonal shifts, and unfavorable product ingredients. As you get older, your dry skin takes more of a hit because it’s getting thinner, not to mention the years of wear and tear that it has already endured. Your body isn’t as physiologically equipped to restore your natural oils, which subsequently leads to dry skin.
Although what you put on your dry skin is important, what you put in your body is just as critical, which is where anti-aging foods come into play. The healthier you are on the inside, the better your dry skin will look on the outside. There are plenty of anti-aging foods that double as natural anti-aging skin care remedies. Here are just a few of the best anti-aging foods for dry skin.

4-Anti-Aging-Foods-to-Fix-Your-Dry-Skin_PAGE-2Fish

Fish are always on the top of the list of anti-aging foods because they contain omega-3 fats, which have been shown to do wonders for dry skin. On top of being anti-inflammatory, omega-3 fats are essential nutrients that have the power to strengthen your skin cells and protect against harmful UV damage by reinforcing your cell membrane—the cell membrane is what serves as your skin’s natural barrier from pollutants and an entryway for nutrients. The stronger your cell membrane is, the better equipped your skin is to retain moisture, which can reverse the effects of dry skin.

The types of fish with the most omega-3 fats—so the best varieties for dry skin—are mackerel, lake trout, herring, tuna, and salmon. To get the most out of fish for dry skin, avoid anything battered or fried; opt for baked, roasted, or grilled fish instead.

Other anti-aging foods that are good for dry skin because of their high omega-3 content include walnuts, flaxseed, soybeans, and canola oil.

Sources:

“9 Best Foods to Nourish Dry Skin,” StyleList.com web site; https://www.stylelist.com/view/9-best-foods-nourish-dry-skin/#!fullscreen&slide=aol_5724255, last accessed August 29, 2013.
Bouchez, C., “Want Healthy Skin? Feed It Well,” WebMD web site; https://www.webmd.com/beauty/skin/want-healthy-skin-feed-well, last accessed August 29, 2013.
Cade, M., “How to Moisturize From the Inside Out,” Discovery Fit & Health web site; https://health.howstuffworks.com/skin-care/moisturizing/basics/moisturize-from-the-inside-out2.htm, last accessed August 29, 2013.
Kitchens, S., “The Most Hydrating Foods For Dry Skin And Hair: Cucumbers, Fish And…Celery?” Huffington Post web site, November 28, 2011; https://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/11/28/hydrating-foods-dry-skin-hair_n_2193919.html.

4-Anti-Aging-Foods-to-Fix-Your-Dry-Skin_PAGE-3Spinach

Spinach is one of the best anti-aging foods for dry skin because it’s loaded with vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants. Dry skin can sometimes be accredited to a vitamin A deficiency. Spinach contains beta-carotene, which is converted into vitamin A in the body, and vitamin A is essential for healthy skin. Spinach also contains vitamin E, which is an antioxidant that can neutralize the harmful free radicals that damage your cells—free radical damage leads not only to dry skin, but also to a breakdown in the collagen proteins that give your skin its elasticity. Vitamins A and E are both known for protecting dry skin from UV rays.

Spinach is a more effective anti-aging food when it’s cooked because of two reasons: your body is better able to break it down and it boosts its antioxidant power. According to studies, cooked spinach leads to higher beta-carotene levels in the blood than raw spinach does—an even bigger advantage for dry skin.

Sources:

“9 Best Foods to Nourish Dry Skin,” StyleList.com web site; https://www.stylelist.com/view/9-best-foods-nourish-dry-skin/#!fullscreen&slide=aol_5724255, last accessed August 29, 2013.
Beck, L, “Is spinach more nutritious raw or cooked?” The Globe and Mail web site, August 23, 2012; https://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/health-and-fitness/ask-a-health-expert/is-spinach-more-nutritious-raw-or-cooked/article565617/.
Cade, M., “How to Moisturize From the Inside Out,” Discovery Fit & Health web site; https://health.howstuffworks.com/skin-care/moisturizing/basics/moisturize-from-the-inside-out2.htm, last accessed August 29, 2013.
Page, A., “How Does Vitamin E Benefit the Skin?” Discovery Fit & Health web site; https://health.howstuffworks.com/skin-care/information/nutrition/vitamin-e-benefit-skin.htm, last accessed August 29, 2013.

4-Anti-Aging-Foods-to-Fix-Your-Dry-Skin_PAGE-4Cucumber and Celery

Cucumber and celery are both hydrating anti-aging foods for dry skin because they both contain silica. Silica is a trace mineral that is a necessary component in the production of collagen. As you age, you naturally start to lose collagen proteins and as a result, you’re often left with thinning, wrinkled, and dry skin. Silica feeds dry skin because it helps boost collagen production—the more collagen you have, the better your dry skin will look.

It isn’t only your collagen level that declines with age. Your body also retains less silica as you get older. That’s also why your joint health can deteriorate with age—silica helps to maintain the condition of connective tissues. So, it’s important to eat silica-rich anti-aging foods for dry skin as well as for your overall health. Other anti-aging foods that are high in silica include brown rice, whole oats, kelp, and asparagus.

Sources:

Kitchens, S., “The Most Hydrating Foods For Dry Skin And Hair: Cucumbers, Fish And…Celery?” Huffington Post web site, November 28, 2011; https://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/11/28/hydrating-foods-dry-skin-hair_n_2193919.html.
Kresser, C., “Nutrition for Healthy Skin: Silica, Niacin, Vitamin K2, and Probiotics,” Chris Kresser L.AC web site, September 21, 2012; https://chriskresser.com/nutrition-for-healthy-skin-silica-niacin-vitamin-k2-and-probiotics.

4-Anti-Aging-Foods-to-Fix-Your-Dry-Skin_PAGE-5Berries

Berries are anti-aging foods for a few different reasons. But when it comes to treating dry skin, their biggest asset is their antioxidant properties, courtesy of their high vitamin C content. Antioxidants, like vitamin C, are the skin care superheroes that fight against free radical damage to keep skin healthy—preventing free radical damage also means preventing dry skin. Vitamin C has a few other functions for dry skin, like aiding in the production of collagen to keep skin firm and hydrated, and helping your skin repair itself. A study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that individuals who ate a vitamin C-rich diet ended up having less age-related dry skin later on when compared against people who only consumed small amounts of vitamin C.

As much as your skin needs vitamin C, it’s a water-soluble vitamin, which means that your body doesn’t store it because whatever isn’t used will dissolve and flush out through urine. That’s why you need to continuously supply your body and your dry skin with vitamin C by eating anti-aging foods like berries and other fruits.

Sources:

Cade, M., “How to Moisturize From the Inside Out,” Discovery Fit & Health web site; https://health.howstuffworks.com/skin-care/moisturizing/basics/moisturize-from-the-inside-out2.htm, last accessed August 29, 2013.
Grumman, R., “Vitamin C can keep you healthy, looking younger,” CNN web site, February 27, 2008; https://www.cnn.com/2008/HEALTH/02/27/healthmag.vitamin.c/.
Sentry, S., “How Does Vitamin C Benefit Skin?” Discovery Fit & Health web site; https://health.howstuffworks.com/skin-care/information/nutrition/vitamin-c-benefit-skin.htm, last accessed August 29, 2013.
“Vitamin C,” MedlinePlus web site; https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/002404.htm, last accessed August 29, 2013.


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