The Anti-Aging Diet That’s Proven to Help You Live Longer

One Diet That’s Proven to Work

One Diet That’s Proven to WorkMy job as an Anti-Aging Specialist is to provide you with the most up-to-date information regarding the role that your lifestyle has upon the achievement of great health and improved longevity. I have previously written several opinionated articles about the benefits of certain dietary approaches to the improvement of human health and successful aging. One anti-aging diet that I have always stood behind is the Mediterranean diet, which is associated with a higher intake of some of the best anti-aging foods, like fresh vegetables, fruit, olive oil, nuts, fish, whole grains, and red wine.

The Mediterranean anti-aging diet has been shown to improve your health in several different ways, some of which I’ve covered before. But some of the more recent reports looked at the effects that the Mediterranean anti-aging diet had upon levels of inflammation inside the body—excess inflammation has been linked to heart attack, stroke, diabetes, and even premature death.

One recent study looked at the specific relationship between this style of eating and certain blood markers of inflammation. In this particular study, the diets of almost 15,000 healthy adults over the age of 35 in central and southern Italy were analyzed. Blood samples of the participants were also analyzed for markers of inflammation. The results indicated that those participants who followed the Mediterranean style anti-aging diet had lower levels of platelets and white blood cells, indicating lower levels of inflammation relative to those who did not follow this diet regimen.

“An important finding of this study is that it indicates that the Mediterranean diet as a whole, and not just a few specific ingredients, is likely responsible for the beneficial health outcomes among the healthy population and should be encouraged as part of healthy eating habits,” explains Dr. Marialaura Bonaccio, the study’s lead author.

One Diet That’s Proven to WorkEven more evidence regarding the benefits of the Mediterranean-style anti-aging diet comes from the conference proceedings of the American College of Cardiology, which outlined recent research from a Greek study. The study analyzed the results from 19 previous reports containing five-and-a-half years’ worth of data on around 162,000 people. Findings revealed that following this specific type of anti-aging diet reduced the risk fordiabetes by 21%, regardless of external factors like age, race, or sex. More importantly, in those people who were already at risk for heart disease, sticking to the Mediterranean anti-aging diet was shown to decrease the risk of developing diabetes by 27%.

These are just two of the studies showing the many health benefits of eating the best anti-aging foods in the Mediterranean diet. What about its effects on obesity, the world’s leading health challenge? Previous evidence has conclusively shown that the adherence to the Mediterranean anti-aging diet can sustain weight loss better than a low-fat diet or calorie counting.

The same study found that this diet includes the best anti-aging foods because they can effectively help to reduce heart attack and stroke risk, which are two main risks associated with obesity. In fact, the research suggests that adopting the Mediterranean anti-aging diet after a heart attack can actually reduce the risk of death by nearly three times. The evidence continues to be very positive regarding the influence this particular anti-aging diet has upon the aging process and improved human health outcomes.

Sources:

Bonaccio, M., et al., “Adherence to the Mediterranean diet is associated with lower platelet and leukocyte counts: results from the Moli-sani study,” Blood 2014; 123(19); doi: 10.1182/blood-2013-12-541672.

Heid, M.,“The Diet That Lowers Your Diabetes Risk 27%,”Huffington Post web site, March 27, 2014; http://www.prevention.com/health/diabetes/mediterranean-diet-guards-against-diabetes.

Hinde, N., “Obesity Could Be Tackled With A Mediterranean Diet, Say Doctors,” Huffington Post web site, November 17, 2014; http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/2014/11/17/obesity-tackled-with-mediterranean-diet_n_6169950.html.

Nordqvist, C., “What is the Mediterranean diet? What are the benefits of the Mediterranean diet?” Medical News Today web site, January 2, 2015; http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/149090.php.

“Study Further Illuminates Heart-Healthy Benefits of Mediterranean Diet,” American Society of Hematology web site, March 31, 2014; http://www.hematology.org/Newsroom/Press-Releases/2014/2537.aspx.

 


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